Bloomberg New Contemporaries 2019

While New Contemporaries is celebrating its seventieth anniversary this year – having been initiated by the Arts Council in 1949 – as well as the fact that Bloomberg have supported the organisation for two full decades, this year is also the first in which new writing is properly embraced as a form of artistic practice. This is not me having a dig at the organisation, on the contrary: it is a sign that with the adoption of publishing as a whole as artistic practice, and the proliferation of courses dedicated to writing as art, writing by artists as (part of) their practice has indeed gone mainstream and is now fully acknowledged as such.

Once again, I am working on the publication as copy-editor (the sixth year in succession, for those who are counting), which by extension is becoming a more fully integrated part of the ever-expanding range of activities that New Contemporaries as an organisation is undertaking, all to nurture and make visible work by emerging artists. It’s been great to see how activities now comprise a wide range of partnerships for different strands of its programming, including studio bursaries, residencies, a mentoring scheme, engagement with The Syllabus, opening up submissions to artists from non-accredited courses, symposia, and, last but not least, a collaborative PhD that explores the organisation’s own history with Nottingham Trent University. This year the exhibition – with work by 45 artists selected by Rana Begum, Sonya Boyce and Ben Rivers – will open at Leeds Art Gallery in September, before travelling on to the South London Gallery, where it was shown for the first time last year. Like the last two years, Hato are the designers.

 

Bloomberg New Contemporaries 2016

Like the previous two years, I copy-edited and proofed this year’s Bloomberg New Contemporaries catalogue. As always, an interesting cross-section of practices is showcased in the exhibition, which launched during the opening of this year’s Liverpool Biennial, and will travel on to the ICA in London later this year. This year’s edition of the catalogue comprises reflections by the selectors – Anya Galaccio, Alan Kane and Haroon Mirza – as well as some of the curators involved at the exhibition venues.

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New Contemporaries Moving Image 1968 – 2010

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Produced to coincide with New Contemporaries’ 65th anniversary, this compilation selected by artists Ed Atkins, Harold Offeh and Catherine Yass, reveals the rich history of artists’ moving image in New Contemporaries between 1968 and 2010. Accompanying the compilation is a publication with contributions from Anna Kontopoulou and Mike Sperlinger, as well as Nick Danziger, Heather Phillipson, Aura Satz and Greta Alfaro, providing a fascinating insight in to the radical beginnings of artists’ moving image and its contemporary importance within the UK today. Copy-editing the various conversations and texts, I learnt a lot about how the history of New Contemporaries – as a platform raising awareness of and providing a platform for new, emerging artists – is inextricably linked with the evolution of film and video as artistic mediums, and therefore a platform like LUX. For more information click here.

Bloomberg New Contemporaries 2014

We’re All Very Disappointed, 2013 webMarking its 65th anniversary, selectors Marvin Gaye Chetwynd, Enrico David and Goshka Macuga have chosen works by 55 of the most promising artists emerging from UK art schools from 1,400 submissions.

Previous New Contemporaries include Jake & Dinos Chapman, Tacita Dean, Mona Hatoum, Damien Hirst, David Hockney and Mike Nelson as well as more recent emerging artists including Ed Atkins, Peles Empire, Nathaniel Mellors, Haroon Mirza and Laure Prouvost.

This year printmaking, moving image and performance occupy much of the final selection as well as an interest in modes of production and materiality. Certain artists explore themes linked to current affairs (Marco Godoy, Melissa Kime, Milou van der Maaden), human behaviour (Simon Senn, Lucy Beech, Stacey Guthrie), language (Matt Copson, Alice Hartley, Imran Perretta), desire (Yi Dai, Katie Hayward, Racheal Crowther, Tajinder Dhami) and the body (Bee Flowers, Yussef Hu, MKLK, Adam Wallace, Xiao-Yang Li).

img-2453New Contemporaries Director Kirsty Ogg asked me to help copy-edit and proof this year’s catalogue. Alongside the usual introductions, it contains an insightful interview by Kirsty with Enrico David.

Following the launch in Liverpool earlier this year, the exhibition will open at the ICA in London late November. The catalogue is due in October.

Top left image: Alice Hartley, We’re All Very Disappointed, 2013