Curating After the Global

Capture

Following on from How Institutions Think (2017), and The Curatorial Conundrum, What to Study? What to Research? What to Practice? (2016), I will shortly start work on Curating after the Global. Following a conference at the Luma Foundation in Arles in September 2017, the book aims to address curating with respect to questions of locality, geopolitical change, the reassertion of nation states, and violent diminishing of citizen and denizen rights across the globe.

It has become commonplace to talk of a globalised artworld, with specific circulations of discourses, commodities, and individuals, and even to speak of contemporary art as a driver of globalisation. This universalisation of what art is, or can be, is often presumed to be claimed at the cost of local traditions and any sense of locality and embeddedness. But what exactly does it mean to be global, or to be local in the context of artistic, curatorial, and theoretical knowledge and practice?

The book will approach these questions in four sections, which include diagnoses of current conjuctures, exhibition histories, institutional repositioning and roadmaps for the future. The editors are Paul O’Neill, Simon Sheikh, Lucy Steeds and Mick Wilson. Among the contributors are: Antariksa, Marwa Arsanios, Athena Athanasiou, María Berríos, Qalander Bux Memon,Ntone Edjabe, Liam Gillick, Alison Greene, Prem Krishnamurthy & Emily Smith, franck leibovici, Nkule Mabaso, Morad Montazami, Paul-Emmanuel Odin, Vijay Prasad, Kristin Ross, Rasha Salti, Sumesh Sharma, Joshua Simon, Hajnalka Somogyi and Françoise Vergès. The book will be designed by Julia and is due out in November, published by The MIT Press.

Advertisements

How Institutions Think

cover-draftFollowing the conference titled ‘How Institutions Think’, which took place in Arles in 2016, and which was organised by CCS Bard, Central St. Martins, Valand Academy (University of Gothenburg) and the Luma Foundation, work has commenced on the book. I will be working on it as managing editor, alongside editors Paul O’Neill, Lucy Steeds and Mick Wilson.

The publication How Institutions Think: Between Contemporary Art and Curatorial Discourse brings together an international and multi-disciplinary group of writers who will reflect upon how institutional practices inform art, curatorial, educational and research practices as much as they shape the world around us. It also aims to propose new and emergent forms of institutional practice. Implementing a work-together methodology, combining and sharing networks and knowledge resources, the publication asks how we may begin to conceptualise and build possible institutions/anti-institutions of the future: What are the models, resources, skills and knowledge bases required to build new and progressive institutions now and in the future, if that is indeed possible?

Contributors include Nataša Petrešin-Bachelez, Dave Beech, Mélanie Bouteloup, Nikita Yingqian Cai, Binna Choi and Annette Kraus, Pip Day, Clémentine Deliss, Keller Easterling and Andrea Phillips, Bassam El Baroni, Charles Esche, Patricia Falguières, Patrick D. Flores, Marina Gržinić, Stefano Harney, Alhena Katsof, Emily Pethick, Sarah Pierce, Zahia Rahmani, Moses Serubiri, Simon Sheikh and Mick Wilson.

How Institutions Think is the second in a series of three publications and builds on the success of The Curatorial Conundrum: What to Study? What to Research? What to Practice? (Cambridge, MA: The MIT Press, 2016).It is due in September 2017.

Two at Once

I spotted both The Curatorial Conundrum and Olivia Plender, Rise Early, Be Industrious at last weekend’s Offprint art book fair at Tate Modern. The former at both the stand of the Luma Foundation and MIT, the latter at Sternberg‘s.

It’s always surprising to finally hold something in your hands after having engaged with it so intensely for often quite a while via a computer screen. On screen everything is backlit and the sense of actual scale, physical weight, the feel and colour and bendiness of the paper, how it actually falls when you open the book, and how the cover relates to the book block, are removed from the actual encounter.

With both books I was very pleasantly surprised by their scale and the paper, and the actual weight, holding them in hand. I’d picked some copies of Olivia’s book up a while ago in Glasgow, but The Curatorial Conundrum I hadn’t seen yet. And one thing is clear, orange is the new black also in book design…